Swakopmund

Geographically Swakopmund is situated amidst dunes and desert close to the mouth of the Swakop River. During the colonial period Swakopmund was an important harbour, although the conditions were not really favourable: the coastal waters were far too shallow, a sheltered lagoon was missing and the surf was much too strong.

Additionally the harbour of Luederitz was too far away and the nearby Walvis Bay harbour was under British occupation. As the disembarkation of settlers and troops on surf boats was a life threatening undertaking, an artificial harbour was built at very high costs and from 1894 regular freight traffic started led by a shipping company in Hamburg. Initially a 325 meter long, wooden jetty was built in 1902, which was replaced by an iron one in 1912. The complete supply of the colony was handled via Swakopmund. The remains of this Jetty can still be seen today and in 2010 an oyster bar even opened on the so called “Jetty”.

Like Lüderitz on the south coast, with its half-timbered German architecture, seaside promenades and pervasive Gemütlichkeit (a distinctively German appreciation of comfort and hospitality), Swakopmund, especially out of season, can feel like a holiday town along Germany’s North Sea and Baltic coasts transplanted onto African soil. But the city is also thoroughly African.

As Namibia’s most sought-after holiday destination, Swakopmund, has in recent years become the main tourist hub of the country. No longer the sleepy village at the edge of the cold misty coastline, Swakopmund is now fast becoming the business and incentive travel capital of the Southern African region. and its multidimensional appeal means that most people end up staying longer than they planned.

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Namibia destinations

Africa Safaris

Offers world-class cities, outstanding wildlife safaris, breath-taking landscapes and activities and sophisticated restaurants and bars serving some of the very best food and wine to be found anywhere in Africa.

Botswana is the ultimate safari destination. Here you will experience a traditional big game wildlife safari in one of Botswana’s top destinations. Wildlife and guiding are superb and the service is second to none. Botswana offers a stunning safari experience. The evergreen jewel of the Okavango Delta is at the heart of Botswana’s safari attractions, flanked in the east by the rolling savannah of the Savuti and the teeming elephant paradise of the Chobe.

Clocking in at twice the height of Niagara Falls, the Victoria Falls(zambia side) is one of Africa’s greatest and most-visited attractions. Traditionally known as Mosi-oa-Tunya or ‘the Smoke that Thunders’, Vic Falls is often the end-point of a Southern African safari.

Beautiful Zimbabwe is home to warm people and wildlife galore, not to mention the spectacular Victoria Falls, one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World.

Rwanda has two rainy seasons: the first is from around February to June and the second from September through December. These are separated by two dry seasons: June to September, during which there is often no rainfall at all, and a shorter dry period from December to February. Typically the west and North-west of Rwanda receives more rainfall annually than the South-east and east of the country.